Networking

Design

Your Path:

Use resources to design your desired path to career satisfaction. (Professional documents, Social Media, Experiential Learning, Graduate and Professional School, etc.)

Career & Job Search Strategies

Networking

A vital component to any job search is networking, which is more than cheesy introductions, handshakes and small talk. Various research studies on this topic indicate that 40-80% of people get jobs through their contacts (i.e. networking). Below is a list of various networking tactics:

Spread the Word

  • It may seem basic, but as soon as you know you will be on the job market, get the word out! Tell your friends, family members, neighbors, classmates, professors, teammates, previous bosses, and others what skills you have and how you are hoping to use them in a job setting.

  • Keep an open mind about who might be helpful because it is a small world!

  • Ask your contacts to keep their eyes and ears open for opportunities that might be a good fit for you - at their company, in their industry, or anywhere.

Informational Interviews

Informational interviewing is a great way to establish a relationship with people in your field of interest.

Alumni

  • Remember to keep in touch with classmates that graduated ahead of you (you never know who will be able to pass your résumé on to the hiring manager).

  • See if your advisor and professors keep a list of employers who have hired graduates of your program.

  • Check with the Alumni Association for a possible list of alumni who might be willing to provide career guidance. If you are focusing your job search on a particular geographic area, get connected with the local MSU Alumni chapter.

Attend Campus and Community Events

  • The Career Center, along with many other campus departments and organizations periodically invite guest speakers and employer representatives to campus to speak to student about various career related topics. Attending such events is an easy way to connect with professionals in your field or related fields.

  • Student organizations and community organizations both on and off campus also serve as a great way to meet professionals in your field.

Social Networking (Social Media Platforms) – Get Connected

Employers DO use internet search engines and social networking sites to check up on potential hires.

  • Use your site as a marketing tool. Highlight your resume, accomplishments, and professional skills.

  • Be cautious about content you put on social networking sites such as Instagram and Facebook.

  • Check social networking sites for profiles of employers that interest you.

Social Networking Tips/Considerations

  • Google yourself. Look into removing anything potentially damaging to your character.

  • Change your privacy settings. Make sure you know exactly who can view your profile, your wall, your applications, etc.

  • Carefully consider how much/what type of information you include on your Profile (Status Updates, Quotations, About Me, Religious/Political Views, etc.). Remove anything that is remotely inappropriate.

  • Photos you upload should never cast yourself in a negative light or compromising position. Untag yourself if someone uploads a questionable photo of you.

  • It's not just about you! What your friends include on their profiles can be linked to you as well.

  • Bottom Line: If Grandma would blush, remove it.